Nvidia Releases 319.23 Driver, Neglects Major HDMI Regression

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Hot on the heels of Nvidia’s new GTX 780, the new top-of-the-line for consumer video cards, Nvidia did not spare 24 hours before releasing version 319.23 of their Linux driver.  What’s new in this release?  Well, a whole lot of everything, including support for the GTX 780 itself!  Here is a brief overview of the changes you can expect.

  • Added support for the following GPUs:
    • GeForce GTX 780
  • Fixed a regression that could cause X to crash when querying GPU information through NV-CONTROL on multi-GPU systems where some GPUs failed to be initialized for X.
  • Fixed a bug that could cause X to crash when using Vertex Buffer Objects (VBOs) with indirect rendering.
  • Fixed a bug that prevented some drop-down menus in nvidia-settings from working correctly when using older versions of GTK+.
  • Fixed RandR panning reporting when the current MetaMode is smaller than the X screen.
  • Fixed a regression that caused nvidia-installer to attempt post-processing of non-installed files.
  • Added the “ForceCompositionPipeline” and “ForceFullCompositionPipeline” MetaMode options. See the README for details.
  • Added support for HDMI 4K resolutions. Using a 4K resolution with an HDMI display requires a Kepler or later GPU.
  • Added support in VDPAU for 4k resolution MPEG-1/2 and H.264 video decoding, up to 4032×4048 for MPEG-1/2 and 4032×4080 for H.264, and up to 65536 macroblocks for both.

For home theater enthusiast, the most compelling feature of this new driver is support for decoding video at 4k resolutions with VDPAU.  Compelling is about all that it is however, considering that it’s unlikely any of you have genuine, 4k video occupying 200GB of your disk space that you need to view on Linux.  Though, we could be wrong.

There is one astonishing omission however; HDMI audio has been broken on Nvidia cards since Kernel 3.8.  Those who were looking for, at best, a hotfix, have been left out in the cold.


Dean Howell

Dean Howell has over a decade of experience with Linux and nearly 2 decades of experience with computers in general. Currently, Dean is Editor-in-chief of The Powerbase and also works for one of the world's largest providers of Linux-based NVRs.

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  • Eisa わ

    Also, another fact, that kernel 3.10 has been out for quite some time and Nvidia still hasn’t fixed the ‘proc’ arugment error.

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