CyanogenMod Installer Removed from Google Play Store

cm_installer_feat
Why do you hate me?

Why do you hate me?

A bit of news sure to disappoint fans of Cid, the CyanogenMod team recently took to their blog to explain the removal of the exceptionally popular “CyanogenMod Installer” from the Google Play Store. Despite being installed on more than 100,000 devices and maintaining a 4.2 star average rating, Google has decided this particular little blue guy isn’t up to snuff.

Cordial Ejection

It’s worth noting that Google didn’t pull the CM Installer from the Play Store, rather they contacted the team and asked that they voluntarily remove the application before Google themselves had to intervene.

This strikes us as a relatively classy way to tell somebody you don’t want them publishing their software in your marketplace, and it’s certainly a step up from the treatment most developers are given: your application get’s thrown out on its ass like the drunk guy who keeps making trouble.

When the CM team asked Google for clarification as to why they were being escorted out the door, they actually sent them a proper response rather than pointing them to the TOS with a canned message:

After reaching out to the Play team, their feedback was that though application itself is harmless, and not actually in violation of their Terms of Service, since it ‘encourages users to void their warranty’, it would not be allowed to remain in the store.

CM Blog

Looking Ahead

It’s hard to argue with Google’s point. While the CM installer is undoubtedly an excellent gateway to get new users in to the world of custom Android ROMs, there’s absolutely a concern about less knowledgeable users getting themselves into a bad situation with this type of software.

Of course, in the end, the Play Store is Google’s domain and they can do whatever the hell they please. It seems pretty unlikely that the CM Installer will be returning to the official Android ecosystem anytime soon, but the CM team says they’ll be looking into getting onto alternative Android repositories such as the ones offered by Amazon and Samsung, so those looking for a one-click installation of the world’s most popular community Android ROM hopefully won’t be out in the cold for too long.


Tom Nardi

Tom is a Network Engineer with focus on GNU/Linux and open source software. He is a frequent submitter to "2600", and maintains a personal site of his projects and areas of research at: www.digifail.com .

Related posts

Top